A bullet list is an unordered list grouping a set of related items. Any item may contain a sub-list.

Syntax

We can use -, + or * to mark the items of an unordered list. We have to stick to the one we started with in every list. There are two basic kinds of lists, tight and loose. A list with sub-lists is called nested.

Tight

- The minus sign `-`
- The plus sign `+`
- The asterisk `*`

When there is not a single blank line between the items, we get a tight list. Every item can contain only one text block.

Loose

- A loose list may contain more than one paragraph. You only have to keep the indentation on the same level.

  Like this. Here we have separated paragraph inside of the same list item.

- Here we are again after a blank line and we are still inside our list.

The items of a loose list are separated by a blank line. The items may span across some paragraphs. A subsequent paragraph has to be indented at least as far as the first character of its predecessor:

Nested

- To start a sub-list
  - we have to indent the item
    - By two spaces
    - Or one tabulator
  - We may use a different marker
    + but that's not important
    + the correct indentation
- is all that matters

To start a sub-list inside a list item, the markers of the sub-list have to be indented by two spaces or a tabulator. For your convenience you may switch the list marker for a new list level, but the indentation is all that matters.

Layout

Perplex is styling tight, loose and nested lists of both kinds. As additional option, you may enforce a smaller indentation on tight lists with a class attribute.

Tight

  • The minus sign -
  • The plus sign +
  • The asterisk *

Loose

The loose items from above look like this:

  • A loose list may contain more than one paragraph. You only have to keep the indentation on the same level.

    Like this. Here we have separated paragraph inside the same list item.

  • Here we are again after a blank line, and we are still inside our list.

  • By the way: It is not possible to mix tight and loose lists. Even if there is only one blank line between the items, the list is treated by Goldmark as a loose list.

  • If you changed the marking symbol inside a list, Goldmark will begin a new list, even if there are no blank lines. To use this intentionally to separate lists would be confusing.

Every block, which is not indented, closes the list.

Nested

Tight

Tight lists are vertically spaced like normal paragraphs:

  • To mark your list items you could also use
    • the asterisk *
      • the asterisk is usually used to mark emphasized text
      • therefore its use as a list marker may be confusing.
    • Better stay with
      • the plus sign + or
      • the minus sign -
  • And back to the first level

As you can see, a tight nested list tends to look a cramped. Maybe we are always better off with loose nested lists, even if the items are short. Or we may try a smaller indentation.

On mobile screens the indentation of list items is already smaller. To enforce the smaller indentation on all screens, we add the attribute {.smallindent}.

  • To mark your list items you could also use
    • the asterisk *
      • the asterisk is usually used to mark emphasized text
      • therefore its use as a list marker may be confusing.
    • Better stay with
      • the plus sign + or
      • the minus sign -
  • And back to the first level

Loose

If there is at least one empty line between the items of a list and every sub-list, the result looks like this:

  • A loose list may contain more than one paragraph. You only have to keep the indentation on the same level.

    Like this. Here we have separated paragraph inside the same list item. And we can explain and explain until we don’t know what to write anymore. And we can even start a nested list.

    • Here we have the first item of our new loose sub-list. There may be a lot of content inside such an item. A new sub-list for example:

      • the asterisk is often used to mark emphasized text

      • therefore, its use as a list marker may be confusing.

    • Here we have the second item of our first sub-list. There may be a lot of content inside such an item.

  • Here we are again after a blank line, and we are still inside our list.
    By the way: It is not possible to mix tight and loose lists. Even if there is only one blank line between the items, the list is treated by Goldmark as a loose list.

  • If you change the marking symbol, Goldmark starts a new list even if the
    markdown items are tight. But it may be a bad idea to use this as a way of separating two lists.